Home Design Inspiration: Custom Parquet with Border

Our job supervisor Anthony and his crew installed this custom parquet style flooring using 3/4″ x 4″ rift sawn white oak with an American walnut border. This customer has a three story foyer, so this custom flooring created a dramatic entrance to their center hall colonial-style home.

The flooring was installed unfinished and site-finished by our refinishing crew.

Check out this slideshow to the progress of the installation and finishing.

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Need help with your custom wood flooring project? Contact the experts at Dan Higgins Wood Flooring.

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Before & After: Insert with Border

Last week, our job supervisor Anthony and his crew replaced this carpet insert with Bruce Dundee 3 1/4″ solid oak “gunstock” flooring installed diagonally with a dark Bruce Dundee 3 1/4″ solid oak “mocha” border.

 

 

Thank you to our customer, Cindy Perr, for these great photos “Before and After” photos. Here are some more photos of the finished product.

 

 

Contact Dan Higgins Wood Flooring for a free estimate.

Do’s and Don’ts of Wood Floor Maintenance

Nobody likes cleaning. So it’s no wonder that 58% of consumers consider ease of cleaning as one of the top factors for choosing their flooring, according to a survey by the National Wood Flooring Association. That’s why wood flooring continues to be the favorite flooring among homeowners. With just a few common sense tips, your hardwood flooring will last a lifetime.

DO sweep or vacuum regularly.

By getting rid of debris, you help protect your floor’s finish from wear-and-tear.

DON’T wet mop or steam clean.

Wood is a natural product that reacts to humidity. Water and steam can damage the flooring.

DO use recommended wood flooring cleaner spray.

The only cleaning product you need in cleaner spray designed for wood flooring. We recommend Bona or Squeaky brands, which are available in our showrooms in spray bottles and concentrated refills.

DON’T use “refreshers” products.

While these “refresher” products are sold to consumers, only a wood flooring professional should be applying any finishes to your flooring. Misuse of “refresher” products is our number one customer maintenance issue.

DO use felt protectors on furniture legs.

Felt protector pads on the furniture legs protects your flooring from scratches. We recommend EZ Glide surface protectors.

DON’T slide your furniture.

Even with felt protectors, dragging heavy furniture can scratch the finish or even damage the wood itself. Lift or use a moving blanket.

DON’T walk in damaged high heels or cleats.

Metal cleats and exposed heel nails can scratch or even dent wood flooring. A 125-pound person walking in high heels exerts up to 8,000 pounds per square inch of pressure on the heel.

DO control the temperature and humidity.

Solid wood flooring is a natural product that expands and contracts based on the moisture in the air. If the humidity is too low, the flooring can gap and expose the tongues of the boards. If the humidity is too high, the flooring can expand and cup.

DO read the manufacturer guides.

Most flooring manufacturers have information posted on their website about how to maintain your flooring and keep it covered under their warranty.

DON’T be afraid to ask questions.

If you have questions about maintaining your hardwood flooring, contact the experts at Dan Higgins Wood Flooring.

 

 

Fall Mirage Rebate Sale

Starting October 2nd, 2017, Mirage Floors is offering  a $0.50 per sq. ft. rebate on hardwood flooring purchases. The sale includes all species, colors, and widths of Mirage Classic, Mirage Engineered, and Mirage Lock products.

Dan Higgins Wood Flooring is a Mirage Floors Elite Maestro Dealer. As Elite Dealers, we provide the full range of Mirage products and services.

The rebate sale runs through November 25th, but our installation calendar is already filling up with customers who want new flooring for the holidays.

See our selection of Mirage Products in our showroom.

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For more information, contact us.

For complete rules and information, visit Mirage’s Website.

 

FAQs about Stairs and Wood Flooring

Updating your staircase can be a finishing touch to your flooring project. But sometimes, what seems like a cherry on top on your project can be the most confusing. Here are some questions we’re often asked about stairs and wood flooring:

What kind of staircase do I have?

Staircases are categorized as either “closed” or “open”. A closed stairs, or boxed stair case, has either a wall or stringer on each side of the stair treads. Stairs can also be open on one or both sides, where there is no wall or stringer on the side and the stair ends at the tread.

How do spindles affect my stair project?

If the stair spindles are installed directly into the stair tread instead of a stringer, any changes to the stairs become much trickier. They often need to be removed before any work is done on the stairs, or worked around very carefully.

Can I installing flooring on my stairs?

Some installer will install pieces of flooring on the stairs, finished with a stair nosing. Over time, the strain put on the nosing will cause it to break off. Instead, we install a solid wood tread on the steps; we want your installation to last.

Can’t I just get one of those kits from a hardware store?

You can, but the do-it-yourself kits are often made with lower quality, flimsy materials that bend, cup, or split. High quality, solid treads can be installed properly and will last much longer.

What happens if one of my steps is a different shape than the other steps?

In our shop, we custom cut the treads to the shape required. Many of the tread kits sold in stores don’t accommodate rounded treads, only rectangular.

Should I get white or stained risers?

It’s all a matter of taste. Some people like the more uniform look of stained risers so that everything matches. Other people prefer the clean, finished look of white risers. Both options look great.

Does my staircase have to match my flooring?

The most popular look is to have the stair treads complement the flooring on the first floor. However, some people prefer to have the stairs complement the upper floor, and others prefer to have the stairs contrast both.

Can I get my stairs refinished?

Solid stair treads can be sanded, stained, and refinished along with the flooring.

What if I have more questions about my stairs as part of my wood flooring project?

Contact the experts at Dan Higgins Wood Flooring.

Inspiration Photos

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When the “Best Price” for Floors is Actually the Worst

You’ve probably seen your share of poor work done by contractors, and wonder why people would hire someone to do that type of work. Unfortunately, those contractors continue to get work every day by selling on price alone. In the home improvement industry, you will get what you pay for. We cringe every time we hear someone say they got a “better” price somewhere else. They always mean “lower price”, and there is a big difference between the two. Here’s the situations when the “best price” is actually the worst price:

It’s not for the whole job.

Some contractors will bait you by showing a ridiculously low price, leaving out many of the costs associated with the job. The price given may be for just the product, while only giving a per-square foot price for installation. Unless the room is bare to the subfloor, the quote should also include the price for removing and disposing of the current flooring. Trim and transition pieces should also be accounted for. If these costs are not factored into the quote, you’ll either have an unfinished job or be surprised by a ballooning budget at the end. You need real numbers based on your costs to have the work done properly, so that you can budget and make an informed decision.

It’s for the wrong product.

The wrong product at the right price is still the wrong product. Big box stores will sell “house brands” or “private label” brands, which are the lower quality “leftovers” of flooring manufacturers. We install flooring from nationally-recognized brands backed by their manufacturers. Some contractors will install the cheapest flooring they can find so they can underbid the competition, not knowing or caring if the flooring is right for your home.

It’s not from a reputable company.

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A job left unfinished by a contractor

Anybody can claim they can install flooring: how do you know the quality of their work? That “great” price won’t be so great when you have to pay another company to fix the work. Do some research before choosing an installation company. Check project photos and reviews on sites like Google, Facebook, and Houzz. Make sure the installer is licensed to work in your state.

Big box companies hire the lowest-bidding contractor, who will work as fast as he can because he gets paid by the square foot. Then when an issue arises with an installation, the store can point the finger as the contractor to avoid responsibility. While writing this article, we received a call from a customer who had a “friend” install their wood flooring for them. When it came time to finish the job at the doorways, he left the job site and never came back. It’s a story we hear time and time again. We offer a lifetime installation warranty, so we stand behind our installations.

Get a free in-home quote from Dan Higgins Wood Flooring.

6 Shopping Tips for Your DIY Wood Flooring Project

Ready to start your DIY wood flooring installation project? Before you start shopping, check out these tips to get your project started off right.

1. Pick the right product.

The type of flooring–solid wood, engineered wood, laminate, or LVT–that can be installed in a room depends on many variables: type of subfloor, grade level, moisture levels, and other factors. Make sure you have all of the information you need before you start shopping.

2. Evaluate installation methods.

Depending on the type of product, your flooring may need to be nailed down, glued, or floated. Floating a lock-and-fold floor is generally considered the easiest of the three methods, since the floor snaps together and does not need to be adhered to the subfloor. Nailing or gluing flooring is more difficult, so consider a professional installation if you’re not an experienced DIYer.

3. Allow for waste.

If your room is 150 square feet, you can’t just buy 150 square feet of wood. Every product is packaged differently, so the amount of square footage per carton varies. Plus, some boards will need to be cut to fit the room. Generally, a do-it-yourself will need to allow for more waste than a professional flooring installer. Factor in a 5-10% waste factor when calculating square footage needed for your project. Then, round up to the nearest carton.

4. Factor in extras.

When calculating your project budget, don’t forget the additional materials and tools that will be required for the job. For a nail-down installation, you’ll need to buy or rent a floor nail gun–we let our customers borrow a nail gun at no charge. You will need some additional supplies: vapor barrier, foam, staples, glue, putty, or others. We offer many of the supplies needed for a flooring installation, so you can order all of your supplies together.

5. Check the manufacturer guide.

Most flooring manufacturers have guidelines that must be followed for installation. If those guidelines are not followed and there’s a problem with the flooring, the manufacturer will not cover the floors under warranty. Before you decide on a product, read the manufacturer guide to make sure you’ll be able to meet the requirements to be covered by the warranty. Most manufacturers have the warranty information available online.

6. Consult the experts.

Need help with your DIY flooring installation? Contact us at Dan Higgins Wood Flooring for all of your do-it-yourself hardwood flooring needs.